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REGIONS

Adelaide Hills

Adelaide Hills

Wine was produced in the Adelaide Hills from as far back as the 1870s, until vines were removed in the 1930s.

Amador County

Amador County

Today the vineyards in California cover about 550,000 acres of land, 2,200 km², and account for about 90% of the USA wine production and is the fourth-largest wine-producing region after France, Italy and Spain. The main wine regions of California are the North Coast, the Central Coast, the Inland Valleys, the Sierra Foothills and Southern California. Each of their regions offers a diversity of wine regions, AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) and vineyards.

Ardeche

Ardeche

Strictly speaking, part of the Rhone valley. Ardeche sits on the western banks of the Rhone river and is an important part of the northern Rhone wine region: the AOC-level appellations Saint-Joseph, Cornas and Saint-Peray are located here.

Barossa Valley

Barossa Valley

The Barossa was settled by English landowners and Silesian immigrants escaping religious persecution in Prussia (now part of Poland).

Beaujolais

Beaujolais

Good Beaujolais is delicious – often relatively light-bodied with lots of youthful fruit and refreshingly high acidity, although more and more ambitious producers are making a denser, more Rhône-like wine. Most Beaujolais should be drunk in its youth and is good when served lightly chilled.

Bordeaux

Bordeaux

Bordeaux wine, sometimes referred to as Claret, is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of southwest France. Bordeaux is centered on the city of Bordeaux, on the Garonne River.  To the north of the city the Dordogne River joins the Garonne forming the broad estuary called the Gironde and covering the whole area of the Gironde department, with a total vineyard area of over 120,000 hectares making it the largest classified appellation ine growing area in France.

Burgenland

Burgenland

Influenced by the hot continental Pannonian climate, the easternmost of Austrian federal states – Burgenland – produces the most opulent and authoritative red wines in Austria, along with complex whites and extraordinarily fine nobly sweet wines. Here, though, there are regional differences – not to be underestimated – that come into play with regard to the natural conditions.

Burgundy

Burgundy

Each wine region in France has its own wine classification. In Burgundy, the concept of “terroir” is very important since it’s the soil that gives its name to the wine (in Alsace, it’s the grape variety, in Bordeaux, the estate). The Burgundy wine-producing land parcel is also called "Climat" (climate). This is a plot of vines, carefully delineated and named for centuries, which has its own history and benefits from specific geological and climatic conditions.

The two most famous permitted grape varieties in Burgundy are Chardonnay and Pinot Noir athough Aligote and Gamay are also allowed.

Champagne

Champagne

Champagne is the most elite sparkling wine region in the world. Many people refer to all sarling wines as Champagne but only grapes grown in the designated region can make a true Champagne.

Clare Valley

Clare Valley

The Clare Valley (technically a series of valleys) enjoys mainly cool nights and mornings.

Coastal Region

Coastal Region

Coastal Region is a significant Wine of Origin designation and wine-producing area in the Western Cape that forms the heart of the South African wine industry.

Eden Valley

Eden Valley

The Eden Valley is flanked on the west by the Barossa Valley Wine region and on the south by the Adelaide Hills.

Elgin

Elgin

Elgin, in the mountains just southeast of Cape Town, is one of South Africa's emerging wine regions. Its vibrant, aromatic wines made from Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay are attracting attention from wine critics the world over...

Etna

Etna

Mount Etna, one of the world’s largest and most-active volcanos, dominates the north-eastern corner of Sicily and was born two hundred thousand years ago in an ancient seabed. The Etna DOC was the very first in Sicily, created in August 1968 although wine has been in continuous production there since ancient times. The rapidly growing interest in the native varieties grown on the slopes of are taking the wine-world by storm.

Gippsland

Gippsland

The Gippsland wine region covers a large area extending from the NSW/Victorian border, along the coast to Wonthaggi just below Melbourne, then west to the edge of the Great Dividing Range.

Heathcote

Heathcote

The Heathcote Wine Region of Victoria, Australia, is nestled between the Goulburn Valley and Bendigo regions. The region is famous for its Shiraz production.

Hemel en Aarde

Hemel en Aarde

Hemel-en-Aarde (which means "heaven and earth" in the Afrikaans language) is a wine-producing area of Walker Bay in the Western Cape of South Africa, about 80 kilometers southeast of Cape Town.

Jura

Jura

Located between Burgundy and Switzerland, this cool climate wine region produces wines with some similarity to Burgundy and Swiss wine. Jura wines are distinctive and unusual wines, the most famous being vin jaune, which is made by a similar process to Sherry, developing under a flor-like strain of yeast, made from the Savagnin grape variety.

Languedoc

Languedoc

Located in Southern France, the Languedoc is part of the large Mediterranean coastal area now known as the Occitanie region, reaching from the Pyrenees mountains on the southeast to the region of Provence in the east. The Languedoc makes up approximately 90 percent of the area and Roussillon accounts for the other 10 percent. Together they represent France’s largest wine-producing region and vineyard area and is the largest vineyard area in the world with a geographic identity.

Loire

Loire

The Loire Valley, in central France along the Loire River and its tributaries, is distinguished by vineyards, farmland and majestic châteaux. A wine-producing region, it’s known for dry whites such as Sancerre and Pouilly-Fumé. The city of Orléans is famed for Gothic Sainte-Croix Cathedral and its association with Joan of Arc. The region's capital, Tours is a busy university town with a medieval quarter.

Maipo Valley

Maipo Valley

The Maipo Valley is one of the most well-known wine-producing regions in Chile, which has earned its reputation for being the home to excellent and renowned red wines. 

Margaret River

Margaret River

Bordered to the west by the Indian Ocean, the Margaret River wine region is one of Australia's largest.

Marlborough

Marlborough

The meteoric rise of Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc over the last two decades has propelled the wines of New Zealand-and Marlborough in particular-onto the world stage.

Martinborough

Martinborough

Martinborough is a village in the South Wairarapa District, in the Wellington region of New Zealand. It is 65 kilometres east of Wellington and 35 kilometres south-west of Masterton. The town has a resident population of 1,680 and is famous for its 20 or so vineyards which are within walking or cycling distane from the main square in the village.

Monetery County

Monetery County

Today the vineyards in California cover about 550,000 acres of land, 2,200 km², and account for about 90% of the USA wine production and is the fourth-largest wine-producing region after France, Italy and Spain. The main wine regions of California are the North Coast, the Central Coast, the Inland Valleys, the Sierra Foothills and Southern California. Each of their regions offers a diversity of wine regions, AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) and vineyards.

Mount Vedeer Napa Valley

Mount Vedeer Napa Valley

Today the vineyards in California cover about 550,000 acres of land, 2,200 km², and account for about 90% of the USA wine production and is the fourth-largest wine-producing region after France, Italy and Spain. The main wine regions of California are the North Coast, the Central Coast, the Inland Valleys, the Sierra Foothills and Southern California. Each of their regions offers a diversity of wine regions, AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) and vineyards.

North Coast

North Coast

Today the vineyards in California cover about 550,000 acres of land, 2,200 km², and account for about 90% of the USA wine production and is the fourth-largest wine-producing region after France, Italy and Spain. The main wine regions of California are the North Coast, the Central Coast, the Inland Valleys, the Sierra Foothills and Southern California. Each of their regions offers a diversity of wine regions, AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) and vineyards.

Otago

Otago

Central Otago has quickly established itself as ground zero for Pinot Noir in New Zealand-in the words of Jancis Robinson, "many believe this is where the Pinot grail is to be found".

Paso Robles

Paso Robles

Today the vineyards in California cover about 550,000 acres of land, 2,200 km², and account for about 90% of the USA wine production and is the fourth-largest wine-producing region after France, Italy and Spain. The main wine regions of California are the North Coast, the Central Coast, the Inland Valleys, the Sierra Foothills and Southern California. Each of their regions offers a diversity of wine regions, AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) and vineyards.

Located halfway between San Francisco and Los Angeles, Paso Robles mixes the fun-loving energy of Southern California with Northern California’s sophistication and innovation. A hot spot for Rhône varietals and blends, it hosts the annual Hospice du Rhône, the world’s liveliest gathering of international Rhône wine producers.

Rhone

Rhone

The vineyards of the Rhone Valley, which forms a corridor between the Mediterranean and Northern Europe, have been producing wines for at least 2000 years.

Rias Baixas

Rias Baixas

Rías Baixas is a Spanish Denominación de Origen (DO) for wines located in the province of Pontevedra and the south of the province of Corunna in the community of Galicia, Spain. Winemaking in Rías Baixas dates back thousands of years, but only during the past few decades has the region established a global reputation as a producer of top quality wines from its signature grape, Albariño.

Santa Barbara County

Santa Barbara County

Today the vineyards in California cover about 550,000 acres of land, 2,200 km², and account for about 90% of the USA wine production and is the fourth-largest wine-producing region after France, Italy and Spain.. The main wine regions of California are the North Coast, the Central Coast, the Inland Valleys, the Sierra Foothills and Southern California. Each of their regions offers a diversity of wine regions, AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) and vineyards.

Santa Barbara has long been a favourite hideaway for movie stars, from Charlie Chaplin to Jane Russell, Kevin Costner and Oprah Winfrey. It’s also a famous wine destination, immortalized in 2004 by the film Sideways, which celebrated the area’s signature Pinot Noir.

Santa Cruz Mountains

Santa Cruz Mountains

Today the vineyards in California cover about 550,000 acres of land, 2,200 km², and account for about 90% of the USA wine production and is the fourth-largest wine-producing region after France, Italy and Spain.. The main wine regions of California are the North Coast, the Central Coast, the Inland Valleys, the Sierra Foothills and Southern California. Each of their regions offers a diversity of wine regions, AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) and vineyards.

One of California’s first AVAs, the Santa Cruz Mountains' growing area is rich with wooded peaks and small vineyards tucked into quiet hillsides. The region is known primarily for Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon.

Santa Rita Hills

Santa Rita Hills

Today the vineyards in California cover about 550,000 acres of land, 2,200 km², and account for about 90% of the USA wine production and is the fourth-largest wine-producing region after France, Italy and Spain. The main wine regions of California are the North Coast, the Central Coast, the Inland Valleys, the Sierra Foothills and Southern California. Each of their regions offers a diversity of wine regions, AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) and vineyards.

Sonoma Coast

Sonoma Coast

Today the vineyards in California cover about 550,000 acres of land, 2,200 km², and account for about 90% of the USA wine production and is the fourth-largest wine-producing region after France, Italy and Spain. The main wine regions of California are the North Coast, the Central Coast, the Inland Valleys, the Sierra Foothills and Southern California. Each of their regions offers a diversity of wine regions, AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) and vineyards.

From rolling hills to towering redwoods, the scenery along the North Coast is as memorable as the wine. With one of the coolest climates in the state, this region is home to more than half of its wineries, including many of the most celebrated. And the North Coast's renowned food artisans craft everything from olive oil to goat cheese, ensuring that your plate is as full as your glass.

Sonoma has many distinctions, but here’s one to note: it grows more Pinot Noir than any other county in the state.
The Sonoma Coast AVA extends from San Pablo Bay to the border with Mendocino County. The appellation is known for its cool climate and high rainfall relative to other parts of Sonoma County. Close to the Pacific, with more than twice the annual rainfall of its inland neighbours, it’s warm enough to ripen wine grapes because most vineyards are above the fog line.

Sonoma County

Sonoma County

Today the vineyards in California cover about 550,000 acres of land, 2,200 km², and account for about 90% of the USA wine production and is the fourth-largest wine-producing region after France, Italy and Spain. The main wine regions of California are the North Coast, the Central Coast, the Inland Valleys, the Sierra Foothills and Southern California. Each of their regions offers a diversity of wine regions, AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) and vineyards.

From rolling hills to towering redwoods, the scenery along the North Coast is as memorable as the wine. With one of the coolest climates in the state, this region is home to more than half of its wineries, including many of the most celebrated. And the North Coast's renowned food artisans craft everything from olive oil to goat cheese, ensuring that your plate is as full as your glass.

Sonoma has many distinctions, but here’s one to note: it grows more Pinot Noir than any other county in the state.

South Australia

South Australia

South Australia is an Australian Geographical Indication (AGI - similar to the European Designation of Origin system) of wine production that covers the entire state of South Australia, Australia.

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